Month: February 2009

Total 28 Posts

10,000 Hours of Practice

10,000 hours. That’s precisely how long you need to practice something before you can even think about calling yourself an expert. Well, at least this is what Malcolm Gladwell claims in his newest book Outliers, which I must say is one of the most fascinating books I’ve ever encountered. The

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You’re Late. What Do you Say?

It’s 7:58 AM and beads of sweat are forming on your forehead. Your pulse rate is increasing as you grip your steering wheel tightly. And to make matters worse… you forgot your mobile phone at home. In 2 minutes you will officially be late for an extremely important meeting with

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Drive and Dedication Power the TBP Process

As a companion to the problem solving funnel or the 8 step approach of the problem solving process at Toyota, there is a set of principles that guide thought and action. Together these make up the newly described way of working called Toyota Business Practice. If the 8 step process

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The Complete Meaning of Shitsuke

There are some Westerners (Americans, Europeans, etc.) who get all bothered when lean folks use too many Japanese terms. So these people go on about how it’s “Policy Deployment” and not “Hoshin Kanri” or it’s “Continuous Improvement” instead of “Kaizen.” My personal opinion, if I may be so blunt, is

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Edwards Deming, Supply Chain Visionary?

This is my contribution to the Supply Chain Anti-trends Cross Blogging series organized by Michael Lamoureux of Sourcing Innovation. The Strategic Sourcerer contributed with a farewell to golden parachuted fat cat CEOs and two other articles. Anti-trends are simply trends going in the opposite direction from the prevailing ones. Sometimes

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A Question About Kaizen

Here is a question for you about kaizen: You have two continuous improvement systems; one which invests in 10 brilliant people each solving one $250,000 problem per year or another system which invests in 1,000 average people solving one $200 problem per month. Which would you choose? Let’s do the

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