The Greatest in the Kingdom

I was recently reading my all time favorite book and came across some comments that caused me to ponder a few of the articles I’ve recently written about being an expert and how many hours it takes to become an expert.

Here’s the text that brought me amazing clarity.

They came to Capernaum and, once inside the house, he began to ask them, “What were you arguing about on the way?” But they remained silent. They had been discussing among themselves on the way who was the greatest. Then he sat down, called the Twelve, and said to them, “If anyone wishes to be first, he shall be the last of all and the servant of all” (Mark 9:33-35).

This pretty much sums it all up wouldn’t you say?

Have a safe, blessed, and outstanding weekend everyone.  And thanks for reading LSS Academy.  I sincerely appreciate it.

5 Comments

  1. Scott Sorheim

    March 12, 2009 - 11:01 pm

    Amen to that. Great post. You have a great weekend, too, even though I need to get through Friday first!

  2. Paul Cary

    March 13, 2009 - 8:40 am

    Amen Brother
    John 13,1-15If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. Verily, verily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord; neither he that is sent greater than he that sent him. If ye know these things, happy are ye if ye do them.

  3. TJBraun

    March 13, 2009 - 9:47 am

    I view myself as a missionary of the Lean/Six Sigma gospel and frequently identify myself to others as a disciple to the principles of Lean/Six Sigma. My choice of vocabulary that I use to express these concepts is to further a clearer understanding of these principles to my audience. However, my analogy stops there.

    This as a segues into a likely sensetive subject. You message is carried to a global presence on the WWW and likely has a very diverse audience. This is your blog, and you are free to use it as you see fit. I myself, find your appropriation of this medium as a pulpit, preachy and untenable.

    I mention this because this behavior has effected by perceptions of this blog. Have you given consideration to how your expressions of faith may be having similar detriments to your audience of the Lean/Six Sigma community?

  4. Ron Pereira

    March 13, 2009 - 9:35 pm

    Hi TJ,

    While I sometimes write about my faith and how it leads me through all aspects of my life I don’t expect everyone to agree with me… nor do I expect them to always see things my way.

    This actually reminds me of something my old boss used to tell his management team. He’d tell us that if all 8 of us always agreed… he had 7 too many.

    Anyhow, I do appreciate your honesty and comments. All the best.

  5. Joseph C Samuel

    March 17, 2009 - 11:59 pm

    Dear TJ,
    I respectfully disagree with what you have written and I have a different point of view. This is by no way to offend you. Trust you would appreciate my view.

    I am from India and I grew up with mostly Hindu and Muslim friends/ neighbours. In our conversations and many of the idioms and phrases are largely from the Hindu/ Muslim texts.

    In Indian corporate training sessions the trainers often quote from the epic “Mahabharatha” and “Ramayana” to explain the meaning. Including me, nobody feels that they are preachy. Even if somebody tells me that their religious belief explain things better, I definitely don’t feel offended. But I may, with respect to his views, may disagree.

    If one is offended because they have quoted from Chrisitian text, another one can get offended because they quote from a Secular faith. If one can’t share about his (christian) faith why another one should insists that every one should follow his (secular) faith.

    One can’t take persmission from all the audience before he says things. I think it is impolite to insist that a presenter should stick to one particular form of thinking.