GA 036 | The Lean Startup with Eric Ries

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Today’s guest is Eric Ries, an entrepreneur and author famous for being at the forefront of the lean startup movement. This episode has plenty of great insight for those both in and outside of the lean startup realm, covering topics like consumer value, waste, and minimal viable products.

An MP3 version of this episode is available for download here.  

In this episode you’ll learn:

  • The quote that inspires Eric (2:12)
  • Eric’s background, and why it’s unusual (3:06)
  • All about Eric’s book, The Lean Startup (14:20)
  • How the content of the book applies to those outside the startup realm (19:46)
  • Eric’s role in introducing lean to those who don’t understand its manufacturing roots (29:58)
  • The most common mistake made in the lean startup world (32:12)
  • Eric’s opinion on bootstrapping (35:47)
  • What’s next for Eric (37:59)
  • What “Respect for People” means to Eric (39:50)
  • The best advice Eric has ever received (40:27)
  • Why Eric doesn’t have a productivity habit (42:12)
  • Eric’s final words of wisdom (50:10)

Podcast Resources

What Do You Think?

Are you familiar with lean startup methodology? How does it differ from traditional lean? How is it similar?

2 Comments

  1. RalfLippold

    December 16, 2014 - 5:50 am
    Reply

    Many thanks Ron for the podcast with Eric and putting up the key points of it.

    Lean Startup has more in common with the traditional lean (thinking) than at first sight. What used to be the physical work & Gemba in an auto company, now applies in the world of digital technology and software-based startups/companies as well.

    From my point of view, and being exposed to the auto and software environment for over 15 years, there is literally no difference in the general principles to both worlds.

    Lean is always about respect to people, learning at an accelerating rate, and applying available tools to the business processes to eliminated waste (seen from the customer’s point of view).

    Does that make sense? What is your thinking?

    • Ron Pereira

      December 19, 2014 - 9:55 am
      Reply

      Thanks, Ralf! Yes, agree, it’s all about people. The tools are, of course, important… but if you miss on the people side of things it really doesn’t matter how good you are at the tools.

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